Frequently Asked Questions

Where Will My Massage or Bodywork Session Take Place?
Your massage will take place in a warm, comfortable, quiet room. Soft music will be played to help you relax. You will lie on a table especially designed for your comfort.

Must I Be Completely Undressed? 

Most massage and bodywork techniques are traditionally performed with the client unclothed; however, it is entirely up to you what you want to wear. You should undress to your level of comfort. You will be properly draped during the entire session.

Will the Practitioner Be Present When I Disrobe? 

The practitioner will leave the room while you undress, relax onto the table, and cover yourself with a clean sheet and blanket.

Will I Be Covered During the Session? 
You will be properly draped at all times to keep you warm and comfortable. Only the area being worked on will be exposed.

What Parts of My Body Will Be Massaged? 

You and the therapist will discuss the desired outcome of your session. This will determine which parts of your body require massage. A typical full body session will include work on your back, arms, legs, feet, hands, head, neck, and shoulders. You will not be touched on or near your genitals (male or female) or breasts (female).

What Should I Do During the Massage or Bodywork Session?
Prior to the massage, feel free to ask the therapist any questions about the technique or the upcoming session. During the massage, make yourself comfortable. The therapist will either gently move you or tell you what is needed throughout the session (such as lifting your arm). Many people just close their eyes and completely relax; communicating if/when they need more or less pressure, another blanket, or anything else relevant to the session. If you have any questions regarding the session or about the particular technique you are receiving, feel free to ask your therapist.

How Will I Feel After the Massage or Bodywork Session? 
Most people feel very relaxed. Some experience freedom from long-term aches and pains developed from tension or repetitive activity. After an initial period of feeling slowed down, people often experience increased energy, heightened awareness, and greater productivity which can last for days. Since toxins are released from your soft tissues during a massage, it is recommended you drink plenty of water following your massage.

Are There Any Medical Conditions That Would Make Massage or Bodywork Inadvisable? 
Yes. That’s why it’s imperative that, before you begin your session, the therapist asks general health questions. It is very important that you inform the practitioner of any health problems or medications you are taking. If you are under a doctor’s care, it is strongly advised that you receive a written recommendation for massage or bodywork prior to any session. Your therapist may require a recommendation or approval from your doctor.

Did You Know?

It’s a fact. Every year, more and more people rely on therapeutic massage and bodywork for relaxation, pain relief, health concerns, rehabilitation and general wellness.

  • Massage may be the oldest form of medical care – Egyptian tomb paintings show people being massaged.*
  • A Chinese book written in 2,700 BC – The Yellow Emperor’s Classic of Internal Medicine – recommended the “massage of skin and flesh”.*
  • Today, 39 million American adults – more than one out of every six – get at least one massage each year.**
  • Massage therapy has been proven effective in:
    Relieving back pain
    Boosting immune system
    Reducing anxiety
    Lowering blood pressure
    Treating migraines
    Decreasing carpal tunnel symptoms
    Easing post-operative pain
    Alleviating side effects of cancer**
  • Because massage and bodywork directly or indirectly affects every system of the body, it promotes health, prevents illness and injury, and speeds recovery.
  • In a recent survey, respondents shared their primary reasons for choosing alternative therapies:
    41% General wellness
    33% Treat an illness
    10% Supplement traditional care
    10% Prevent an illness
    6% Other***
  • 77% of the companies identified as the “100 Best for Working Mothers” offer massage therapy to employees.**
  • 79% of 25 to 35 year olds would like their health insurance plan to cover massage.**
  • In 1996, massage therapy and bodywork was officially offered for the first time as a core medical service in the Summer Olympic Games in Atlanta, and nationally certified practitioners provided key medical services.
  • Today, there are nearly 90,000 nationally certified practitioners serving consumers.

* Holisticonline.com
**American Massage Therapy Association (AMTA) Fact Sheets
***Thomson Medstat

Contact/Location

315-218-6430
everybodymassagecenter@gmail.com

210 Old Bridge Street
East Syracuse, NY 13057